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gringojay

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gringojay
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  • I see that microsporidia have been re-classified from protozoa to fungi. Which makes me think you might try bee hive propolis, since it is anti-fungal; being non-toxic to bees it concievably would be benign to locusts. Propolis is ~30% wax, 5% poll…
  • Those links you gave: 1st is WHO citing 2003 & 2007 reports to declare saturated fat is "causal" of cardiovascular disease. The 2nd is Wikipedia, which is a curated site, with limited independence of content. If you wish to interpret the corre…
  • Take a look at Fig. 20 in the following on-line free full text (a very long review, so I suggest skipping the early content & scroll down to specific section that begins the paragraph above Fig.18&19; see this subtitled as "Dietary choleste…
  • 50 ml of 0.25 Mole oxalic acid (sourced from Ecoxal product name) in a syrup was trickled to honey bees for micro-sporidia control. As described in section 2.2 " field trial" of study (2015) titled "Effect of oxalic acid on nosema ceranae infection"…
  • Yes, sounds like the eggs either when laid got micro-sporidia P. locustae on them or the spores were actually inside the eggs. Fisheries have lots of attempts to deal with their micro-sporidia outbreaks & link below Fig. 2 has good set of clear …
  • Again slupik, - For micro-sporidia maybe the information about honey bee Nosema apis problem will give you some ideas. The isolated microbial compound called "fumagillin" has been used for bees; but it has to be used at a high enough dose to control…
  • If you did not treat the habitat bin surfaces then re-contamination likely resurged from those surfaces. I'll assume you changed out their bins in such a way they could be sanitized? Nosema locustae is now called Paranosema locustae. It is a micro-…
  • Hi bfnth1, - I do not personally rear crickets; maybe someone else will answer you who does. My response is to encourage you to use the forum search function, since it will bring up several details for you & links to reports for easy systems. I…
  • Locusta migratoria are plagued by at least 2 kinds of fungi that are pathogenic to this kind of locust. I don't recall these fungi exact names & can't find those in my notes to relay specifics. My assumption is the contamination came into your …
  • Accordiing to Friedreich & Volland's book (2004) "Breeding Food Animals: Live Food for Vivarium Animals" it takes Zophobas morio longer to reach adulthood (~105 days) than Tenebrio molitor (70 days). And then adult Z. morio females will lay lots…
  • Teleogryllus mitratus can be oven dried, ground & added to broiler chicken feed for better saleable weight. While at 2% T. mitratus content the carcass weight increased from 1,456 +/- 146 grams to1517 +/- 73 grams there are different component…
  • Grass is high in potassium; the level goes down with grass' age & number of cuttings. Orchard grass for example is originally well over 4% to almost 5% potassium: while wheat bran is almost 1.2% potassium. You may find this useful for elaborati…
  • A.T.Minks at Netherland's Wageningen university back in 1967 reared L. migratoria on "... compact bundles of food ... mainly grasses & young plants of several species of cereal, small leaves of lettuce, endive, cauliflower & curled kale ....…
  • There are several studies of how L. migratoria adjusts feed intake based on protein & carbohydrate levels it can get from a meal; they basically self-select for themselves with input from chemo-receptors in mouths. Apparently, in the wild they c…
  • Locusta migratoria can not digest cellulose well & wheat bran is 19% cellulose. The L. migratoria in the wild is called a "grass specialist". I see no logic trying to rear them on a bran diet.
  • Hi Cirickets2019, - I don't rear crickets so am responding somewhat unqualified. If you are closing lid shut on the egg tub from air circulation this may be stopping egg's own gas exchange. The egg is metabolically changing inside. It is possible …
  • Meyer-Rochio's (2017) "Therapeutic anthropods and other largely terrestrial, folk-medicinally important invertebrates: a comprehensive review"; originally published in Journal of Ethnobiology & Ethnomedicine as free full text available on-line .…
  • I am not sure extra vitamin supplementation is of any significant benefit to mealworm larvae or adult beetles. A recent (2017) study indicating this (to me) is worth considering relevant. 100 grams of wheat bran with a potassium content of 953 mg o…
  • Hi slupik, - Nishide & team have several studies on L. migratoria. One thing is they use ~18% moisture for the egg sand. Another research team following team Nishide's methods actually plastic bagged (allowing gas exchange, so not closed) thei…
  • Yes: aeration, temperature & reduce unneccessary substrate. Mostly as these pertain to making our lives easier.
  • Hi joe, - Definitely avoid diatomaceous earth in insect feed & external contact. For specific sample products you can find at least Purina Cricket Chow & also Ghann's Cricket Chow.
  • Hi aleq, - I just read your message. There are probably 2 things giving you problems. 1) - To prevent mealworms getting eaten regularly in your cellar you may have to design a screen cover to protect them. My guess is, as you mentioned, there are s…
  • Hargol Food Tech says has developed manipulated envorment for 2 week grasshopper egg cycle completion instead of 40 weeks. Design uses vertical rearing for maximizing space & because grasshoppers swarm, unlike crickets, collecting large quantiti…
  • Oviposition site preferences have been found in several insect studies & I think we can extrapolate that to include crickets, like the house cricket. Let me try to explain how this may be another factor that can be manipulated for commercial pro…
    in CRICKETS Comment by gringojay April 2018
  • Again jamesjohn70, - You may want to choose an egg laying substrate that allows you to warm it above room temperature economically (sand?); if research using Gryllus texensus extrapolates to A. domesticus. See (2013) "Warm and cozy: temperature and …
    in CRICKETS Comment by gringojay April 2018
  • Again doindi, - Probably your personal methods used will affect your data on how final harvest works out from numbers of crickets began with as stock. According to McCluney & Date's (2008)" The effect of hydration on growth of the house cricket…
    in CRICKETS Comment by gringojay April 2018
  • Hi jamesjohn70, - I don't rear crickets but the above cited report "Model for ... as food" makes some points about egg laying (oviposition) substrate. Briefly: adults kick up that sector & do not want too small an area for this. Likewise too dr…
    in CRICKETS Comment by gringojay April 2018
  • Hi doindi,- Elsewhere in Forum (1993) "Model for usr in mass-production of Acheta domesticus ... as food" graphs the factors influencing cricket numbers end up getting from what begin with.
    in CRICKETS Comment by gringojay April 2018
  • Hi doindi, - Coaloa Valley Farms in California grow "sprouts" in aquaponics fertilized by fish waste & rear their crickets on them. I am presuming that they are not culling these "sprouts" as young as we see the kind of sprouts offered humans. …
    in CRICKETS Comment by gringojay April 2018
  • 850 micron (0.03 inch) mesh let newly hatched mealworm larvae fall through for Morales-Ramos' 2012 report; as discussed in Forum thread "beetles per sq. inch". The cited study used a flow-through design similar to what you envision & left bran/b…